Effects of Spinal Cord Injuries

The spine allows the brain and body to communicate with each other in order that important functions, such as breathing, digestion and movement may occur.

If the spinal cord sustains injury, the body’s ability to carry out these functions may diminish, causing a person to suffer from devastating impairments to sensation and movement in crucial areas of the body.

The experience of serious spinal cord injury claims among our panel of expert solicitors means that they are the ideal legal representation to pursue a compensation claim on your behalf. The help they can provide through obtaining compensation for you will go some way to relieving the burden on you so that you can plan ahead for the future while concentrating on your recovery. Without this vital help, a spinal cord injury can be devastating on all aspects of a person’s life as well as the life of their loved ones.

The extent and severity of the effects of a spinal cord injury differ depending on the category of injury, although all of them almost always affect sensation, movement and function.

Complete Spinal Cord Injuries

Complete Paraplegia

Primary effects may or may not include:

  • Complete loss of feeling in the legs and below the chest
  • Loss of bowel functions
  • Loss of bladder functions
  • Reduced stability when sitting due to compromised abdominal muscles
  • Loss of reproductive functions

Secondary effects may or may not include:

  • Chronic pain
  • Osteoporosis
  • Pressure sores
  • Pneumonia
  • Deep vein thrombosis

Complete Tetraplegia

Primary effects may or may not include:

  • Complete paralysis of the body and limbs or complete paralysis of the body and legs, but with some arm function and the ability to move the head and neck
  • Loss of bowel control
  • Loss of bladder functions
  • Impaired ability to breathe without the aid of medical equipment
  • Loss of ability to cough in order to get rid of waste in the windpipe

Secondary effects may or may not include:

  • Kidney stones
  • Osteoporosis
  • Pressure sores
  • Respiratory infection
  • Deep vein thrombosis

Incomplete Spinal Cord Injuries

Anterior Cord Syndrome

Effects may or may not include:

  • Loss of feeling of pain
  • Loss of feeling of temperature
  • Loss of general strength below the point of damage
  • Feeling of vibration
  • Preserved sense of self spatial awareness

Posterior Cord Syndrome

Effects may or may not include:

  • Lack of control of arms and legs
  • Lack of coordination
  • Preserved muscle power
  • Preserved feeling of pain
  • Preserved feeling of temperature

Central Cord Syndrome

Effects may or may not include:

  • Loss of bowel control
  • Loss of bladder functions
  • Reduced function in the legs which may have the potential for some improvement
  • All arm function is lost
  • All hand function is lost

Brown-Sequard Syndrome

Effects may or may not include:

  • All effects take place below the point of damage in an asymmetrical pattern
  • Preserved ability of movement on the other side of the body
  • Complete loss of movement on one side of the body
  • Loss of feelings of pain and temperature on the side of the body without movement impairment
  • Feelings of pain and preserved feeling of temperature on the movement impaired side of the body

Cauda Equina Syndrome

Effects may or may not include:

  • Severe lower back pain
  • Loss of bowel control
  • Loss of bladder function
  • Partial loss of movement and feeling
  • Complete loss of movement and feeling